Vaccinations
Canine

Like humans, your dogs need vaccines to prevent many diseases that can be contracted by other animals or insects. It is important to keep up to date on vaccinating your pets annually. Vaccines will boost your pet’s immune system by producing disease-fighting antibodies. Whether or not your pet is welcome outdoors, they are still at risk from any bugs or bacteria that may enter the home. Below is a list of vaccines for your dogs, along with the diseases and illnesses they prevent.

Rabies

The rabies vaccine prevents just that: Rabies. This is a viral disease that can be fatal in dogs and cats. This disease can also be transferred to humans! Rabies is transmittable through animal bites, where the virus then enters the host and reproduces, spreading to the salivary glands. Some clinical signs of rabies include changes in behavior, depraved appetite (chewing on non-food related items such as stones or wood), progressive paralysis, and eventually violent seizures leading to death. Unfortunately, there is no treatment for rabies, however it can be prevented with a 1- or 3-year rabies vaccine! This vaccine is REQUIRED by law.

2

DHPP/DAPP

Leptospirosis is an infectious disease that causes damage to the kidneys and liver. A bacteria called Leptospira is what causes this and it is passed through urine, which can remain in the environment for a long period of time. Wild animals can spread this disease to domesticated dogs. The dog’s immune system can usually clear out the bacteria on its own about 8-10 days after becoming infected, however, in most cases the dog is left with kidney or liver failure due to the extensive damage. This becomes fatal very quickly. In less severe cases, antibiotics can be used to treat. Some clinical signs of Leptospirosis are lethargy, vomiting, jaundice, and fever. The leptospirosis vaccine can be given separate

3

Leptospirosis

Leptospirosis is an infectious disease that causes damage to the kidneys and liver. A bacteria called Leptospira is what causes this and it is passed through urine, which can remain in the environment for a long period of time. Wild animals can spread this disease to domesticated dogs. The dog’s immune system can usually clear out the bacteria on its own about 8-10 days after becoming infected, however, in most cases the dog is left with kidney or liver failure due to the extensive damage. This becomes fatal very quickly. In less severe cases, antibiotics can be used to treat. Some clinical signs of Leptospirosis are lethargy, vomiting, jaundice, and fever. The leptospirosis vaccine can be given separately or included in the DHPP/DAPP vaccine. To prevent the disease, the vaccine should be given annually.

4

Bordetella

Kennel cough is determined when the major clinical sign of any infectious or contagious condition in a dog is coughing. This condition is spread when dogs are housed together, such as in shelters, which is why they named it kennel cough. This disease can last up to several weeks if not treated properly. The most common clinical signs are coughing, runny eyes and nose, and wheezing. This can lead to a loss of appetite and depression. There are no specific treatments for the infection, but most clear up within one to three weeks. There are treatments for symptoms. The Bordetella vaccine can prevent kennel cough if given annually. Our clinic offers injectable and oral Bordetella. The oral vaccine gives a more rapid protection than the injectable.

5

Lyme

Lyme disease causes swollen joints, lameness, and fever. It can also affect the kidneys in more severe cases. Lyme disease is caused by tick bites, more specifically, the deer tick. These ticks are very common in Indiana and can survive all year round. They often come inside during the colder months, tracked in on clothes or shoes. To diagnose Lyme disease, a blood test is run. Treatments include antibiotics, but sometimes the infection recurs. To prevent Lyme disease, the Lyme vaccine should be given annually.

6

Influenza

Canine influenza is a virus that has two strains, for which both can spread to and among dogs. Like humans, symptoms can include cough, runny nose, and fever. Canine influenza can be transmitted through coughing, sneezing, and contaminated objects such as furniture and leashes. Dogs that travel, board, or are in contact with other dogs are at risk for influenza. Treatment for this is supportive care. Many dogs will develop a secondary bacterial respiratory infection in a mild case, whereas in a more severe case, they could develop pneumonia and need hospitalization.